Bullers of Buchan


Useful Information

photography
Bullers of Buchan. Public Domain.
Location: At Bullers of Buchan. From Aberdeen coastl road B977 north, turn right at Foveran on A975. 2km from Cruden Bay turn right at Bullers of Buchan, park at the end of town, 5 min walk.
Open: No restrictions.
[2010]
Fee: free.
[2010]
Classification: Speleologysea caves
Light: bring torch
Dimension:
Guided tours:
Photography: allowed
Accessibility: no
Bibliography:
Address:
As far as we know this information was accurate when it was published (see years in brackets), but may have changed since then.
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History


Description

photography
Bullers of Buchan, engraving from 1755. Public Domain.
photography
Bullers of Buchan, engraving from 1755. Public Domain.

Bullers of Buchan is a rather exceptional sea cave, or better a collapsed sea cave which now forms a natural bridge with a pothole behind. The place was named after the nearby village Bullers of Buchan, or probably the other way round. Some say Bullers is a Scots word meaning meaning rushing of water. Unfortunately this Celtic language is mostly spoken, as far as we understood there is no glossary, and so there is no way to know if this is the case. The term was interpreted to be derived from the French bouillir, meaning to boil. So probably the "boiling" water in the pot during stormy weather gave the place actually its name. And after centuries the locals used the word and are now convinced it is a Scots word.

The pothole behind the arch is almost circular and 30m deep. The places was obviously used as a natural harbour, which is shown on the historic engraving. But with an entrance which is only 5m wide and a confined space of probaly 10m by 20m, it is only suitable for small boats.

There are numerous other arches along the coast, which are quite impressive, but not as special as this one, so they are not listed separately. The closest are The Camels’s Back with the Bow of Pitwartlachie arch, and the Rock of Dunbuy with the Arch of Dunbuy. This second one is a little different as it is above the sea.