Klæmintsgjógv


Useful Information

Location: West coast of the island of Hestur. Boats start at Gamlarætt on Streymoy.
(61.9357574, -6.8778601)
Open: no restrictions.
rib62: MAY to AUG Mon-Fri.
For time prebook on website.
[2021]
Fee: free.
rib62: Adult DKK 495.
[2021]
Classification: Speleologysea cave
Light: bring torch
Dimension: L=650 m, V=348,000 m³.
Guided tours: D=90 min, MinAge=8. English
Photography: allowed
Accessibility: no
Bibliography:
Address: rib62, Bakkavegur 2, 176 Velbastaður, Tel: +298-566262. E-mail:
As far as we know this information was accurate when it was published (see years in brackets), but may have changed since then.
Please check rates and details directly with the companies in question if you need more recent info.

History


Description

Klæmintsgjógv is said to be the world´s largest sea cave. There are two huge cracks in the rock which run east west. Both were widened by the erosion of the sea and form straight sea caves, one is called Klæmintsgjógv, the second Húsagjógv Both are crossed in a right angle by a third crack which was also widened to a cave named Trongugjógv and runs north south. All three caves have their own name, they were named before anyone dared to enter them, later the connection was discovered. We guess you already mentioned: gjógv is the Faroese word for cave.

We do not have any speleologic literature about the cave and we guess it was never accurately surveyed, so all the numbers given are just guesstimates. It seems the cave is around 650 m long and has a volume of 348,000 m³. This would place it among the 10 longest sea caves, probably place 8. However, there is no official list by volume, a result of the fact that it is almost impossible to determine the volume. Volume is determined by laser scanning, and the laser scanners require solid ground.

An annual "grotto concert" takes place inside the cave during summer. The natural sounds and acoustics of the cave are an integral part of the music. The concerts are organized by Kristian Blak as a part of the Summartónar festival. Spectators enter the cave in small boats. The musicians leave the boats at the end of the cave and play on the huge blocks which form the rugged cave floor.

The sea caves of Hestur are visited by boat, those boat trips typically start at Gamlarætt harbour on the Streymoy island, which can be reached by car or taxi. The boat goes around the island and shows all caves and other stuff, many birds, probably some delphins and whales too. The direction, if they enter the caves, and if they even go, depends mainly on the weather. Obviously good weather makes it possible to enter all the caves, not so good weather makes the trip more thrilling and is probably better for taking pictures, but with bad weather the tours do not start at all. Other sights on the tour are Loftið, a 365 m high vertical or overhanging cliff, Álvagjógv, another sea cave, the Ólvagjógv gorge and the Trøllhøvdi sea cave. The Mortansholu is a rather small cave in the vertical wall of a huge crack. The entrance is a bit above sea level and reaching it requires a jump up from the boat. We are not sure how this cave formed, but it is obviously not a sea cave, probably it is a blister cave which was widened by erosion.